Our 12 Week Guide To Packing On Muscle

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Have you ever looked in the mirror and thought, “It’s time for a change”? Whether you’re new to the fitness scene or a seasoned gym-goer, I get it – building muscle can seem like a maze of complicated routines and conflicting advice. But fear not! We have a straightforward, no-nonsense 12-week muscle-building plan designed for simplicity and maximum results.

In the next 12 weeks, we will break down the barriers between you and the muscular, lean physique you’ve always wanted. Of course, 12 weeks is not enough time to turn you into Mr. Olympia, but it can get you on the right path. Real results are about focusing on the basics and putting in consistent effort. So, if you’re ready to ditch the confusion, put on your gym shorts, and let’s begin the journey toward a new physique. All you have to do is bring determination, a positive mindset, and a willingness to work.

Table of Contents:

  • 12-Week Muscle Building Workout Plan
  • Understanding The Program: Volume, Intensity and Frequency
  • Training Tips to Build Muscle
  • Nutrition Tips to Build Muscle
  • Supplement Stack for Muscle Mass
  • FAQs

gym workout routine for muscle gain

12-Week Muscle Building Workout Plan

The 12-week muscle-building program has three phases. Each phase has minor tweaks to ensure you progress for the duration of the program. You see, almost everything works. But only for a short period. The key is finding subtle changes to keep things progressing without changing too much.

Two of the most straightforward changes in a program are in how many reps you do and exercise selection. We change the goal reps slightly every four weeks and mix and match assistance exercises.

Research showsyou can build muscle across a broad spectrum of rep ranges.¹ The program uses reps from as low as 4 to as high as 15. Generally, the reps start at the highest level in phase one and progressively lower in phases two and three.

Since each has its advantages, we use a mix of compound and isolation exercises. The main compound free weights (squat, bench press, deadlift, overhead press) stay the same throughout the program. The goal is to stick with the same movements so it’s easy to track strength increases from week one to week twelve. The isolation exercises change every four weeks and will be a mix of resistance machines, dumbbells, and cables.

best workout schedule to build muscle

Workout Phase 1: Weeks 1-4

Day 1: Chest and Abs

  • Bench Press: 3 sets x 10 reps
  • Incline One Arm Dumbbell Press: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Hammer Strength Machine Chest Press: 3 sets x 12-15 reps
  • Cable Crossover: 3 sets x 12-15 reps
  • Hanging Knee Raise: 3 sets x 10-15 reps
  • Ab Wheel: 3 sets x 10-15 reps
  • Weighted Sit Up: 3 sets x 10-15 reps

Day #2: Back and Traps

  • Deadlift: 3 sets x 6 reps
  • Lat Pulldown: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Dumbbell Chest Supported Row: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Reverse Grip Lat Pulldown: 3 sets x 12-15 reps
  • One Arm Seated Cable Row: 3 sets x 12-15 reps
  • Dumbbell Shrugs: 3 sets x 10-12 reps

Day #3: Shoulders and Arms

  • Overhead Barbell Press: 4 sets x 10 reps
  • Cable Side Raise: 3 sets x 12-15 reps
  • Rear Delt Machine Raise: 3 sets x 12-15 reps
  • Rope Triceps Pressdown: 4 sets x 12-15 reps
  • Dumbbell Alternating Curl: 4 sets x 12-15 reps
  • Lying EZ Bar Skull Crusher: 4 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Preacher Curl: 4 sets x 10-12 reps

Day #4: Legs and Calves

  • Back Squat: 4 sets x 10 reps
  • Back Extension: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Leg Press: 4 sets x 12-15 reps
  • Lying Leg Curl: 3 sets x 12-15 reps
  • Standing Dumbbell Calf Raise: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Single Leg Seated Calf Raise: 3 sets x 12-15 reps

guide for building muscle

Workout Phase 2: Weeks 5-8

Day 1: Chest and Abs

  • Bench Press: 3 sets x 8 reps
  • Incline Machine Chest Press: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Flat Dumbbell Fly: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Pec Deck: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Dumbbell Side Bend: 3 sets x 10-15 reps (each side)
  • Machine Crunch: 3 sets x 10-15 reps
  • Plank: 3 sets x 45-60 seconds

Day #2: Back and Traps

  • Deadlift: 3 sets x 5 reps
  • Chin-Ups: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Dumbbell Row: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Neutral Grip Lat Pulldown: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Cable Lat Extension: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Smith Machine Shrugs: 3 sets x 8-10 reps

Day #3: Shoulders and Arms

  • Overhead Barbell Press: 4 sets x 8 reps
  • Seated Machine Lateral Raise: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Cable Facepull: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Cable Overhead Triceps Extension: 4 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Seated Dumbbell Hammer Curl: 4 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Dips: 4 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Dumbbell Incline Curl: 4 sets x 8-10 reps

Day #4: Legs and Calves

  • Back Squat: 4 sets x 8 reps
  • Smith Machine Romanian Deadlift: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Hack Squat: 4 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Seated Single Leg Leg Curl: 3 sets x 10-12 reps
  • Leg Press Calf Raise: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Single Leg Seated Calf Raise: 3 sets x 10-12 reps

good workout plans to build muscle

Workout Phase 3: Week 9-12

Day 1: Chest and Abs

  • Bench Press: 3 sets x 6 reps
  • Incline Barbell Press: 3 sets x 6-8 reps
  • Floor Dumbbell Press: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Seated Incline Cable Fly: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Bicycle Crunches: 3 sets x 10-15 reps (each side)
  • Weighted Decline Sit Up: 3 sets x 10-15 reps
  • Swiss Ball Jackknife: 3 sets x 10-15 reps

Day #2: Back and Traps

  • Deadlift: 3 sets x 4 reps
  • Pull-Ups: 3 sets x 6-8 reps
  • Barbell Row: 3 sets x 6-8 reps
  • Machine Pullover: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • T-Bar Row: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Barbell Shrugs: 3 sets x 8-10 reps

Day #3: Shoulders and Arms

  • Overhead Barbell Press: 4 sets x 6 reps
  • Dumbbell Side Raise: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Dumbbell Rear Raise: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Feet-Up Close-Grip Bench Press: 4 sets x 6-8 reps
  • EZ Bar Curl: 4 sets x 6-8 reps
  • Dumbbell Overhead Triceps Extension: 4 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Low Pulley Cable Curl: 4 sets x 8-10 reps

Day #4: Legs and Calves

  • Back Squat: 4 sets x 6 reps
  • Barbell Romanian Deadlift: 3 sets x 6-8 reps
  • Dumbbell Bulgarian Split Squat: 4 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Lying Single-Leg Leg Curls: 3 sets x 8-10 reps
  • Standing Calf Raise: 3 sets x 6-8 reps
  • Paused Seated Calf Raise: 3 sets x 8-10 reps (pause 1 second at top)

good workout plan for building muscle

Understanding The Program: Volume, Intensity and Frequency

After looking over the training program, you might have a few questions. Over the years of coaching hundreds of clients, I have found it helps to understand the “why” behind the programming. Here are the nuts and bolts of the 12-week plan.

Volume:

Training volume is the total amount of work you do in a workout, combining the number of sets and reps for each exercise, and it’s a key factor in determining how effective your workout is for building strength and muscle. Training volume has been the center of debate for years. Some coaches say high-volume training is best for muscular hypertrophy. However, others claim it’s more about training close to failure with low volume.

The bottom line is that a good program uses enough training volume to facilitate gains without doing too much. How much is that? Research supports aroundten weekly sets per muscle groupas a starting point.² Keep in mind that exercises can train more than one muscle group. For example, a chin-up is a back exercise that is also a biceps exercise. The triceps also get work on pressing movements.

Intensity:

Training intensity is how hard you’re pushing yourself during a workout, often measured by the load on the bar or the effort exerted, and it plays a big role in how effective your training is. For our purposes, I want to focus on effort.

Look, it doesn’t matter how well put together this 12-week program, or any program, is on paper. The thing that will determine how much progress you get over the next 12 weeks will be the effort you put in.

Effort is a hard thing to quantify because it’s largely subjective. Don’t believe me? Ask some folks at the gym how hard they are going. Come back to me when you get someone to admit they are sandbagging. The truth is that most people check all of the boxes except effort. They have a well-constructed training plan, a shaker full of pre-workout, fancy gym shoes, and a $200 lifting belt. The problem is they left their work ethic at home.

I want you to push yourself hard on this program. Take each set close to failure. It’s the best way to ensure you stimulate as many muscle fibers as possible. Keep a journal and aim to beat your previous numbers. The goal is to use heavy weight in each phase.

Frequency:

At first glance at the program, one thing that might stand out is that it’s a “bro split.” A “bro split” is a routine that typically focuses on training individual muscle groups once a week. In the 2010s, the evidence-based fitness community (which I consider myself a part of) rallied against low-frequency training splits in favor of hitting each muscle group multiple times per week.

However,research does not show an advantage to higher frequency training programswhen the training volume is the same.³ In other words, if you do enough volume, it doesn’t matter if you hit each muscle group once a week or multiple times.

There is a time and place for higher-frequency programs like push-pull-legs or full-body workouts. For example, a higher frequency program will be superior when following a high-volume program (15+ sets per muscle per week).

good workout plan to gain muscle

Training Tips to Build Muscle

While running the program, here are some things to keep in mind. Following these tips will allow you to get the most out of the program.

1. Use a Logbook

As mentioned, training intensity matters. So does progressive overload. As you go through the program, keep a detailed record of the sets, reps, and weights you use. Each time you go into the gym, aim to beat the logbook. For example, if last week you did 60lbs for three sets of eight on dumbbell rows, this time, try to do nine or ten reps.

2. Use Good Form

It should go without saying, but using strict form is critical. It’s not only safer but more effective. When building muscle, you want to ensure you keep the tension on the muscle you are trying to train. Using momentum, cutting the range of motion, and doing sloppy reps limit how much muscle you can build. If your entire upper body moves during a curl, you are doing it wrong.

I’m rarely impressed by how much weight someone lifts. However, when I see someone using picture-perfect technique, it always catches my attention.

3. Take Enough Rest Between Sets

Going hand in hand with beating the logbook is taking enough rest between sets. Improving performance is hard if you are trying to speed race through your workouts. Slow down and allow yourself to recover between sets. Take 2-5 minutes of rest time between sets on the compound exercises – squats, bench press, deadlift, and overhead press. You can get by with 1-2 minutes of rest on the isolation movements.

One last thing. Five minutes is shorter than you think. It’s not enough time to scroll social media, go to the bathroom, fill up your water bottle, and chat with the cute girl at the front desk. You don’t need to watch the clock, but sit down, take a swig of water, and go when you are ready to do the same weight again.

workout schedule for building muscle

Nutrition Tips to Build Muscle

As critical as training is, nutrition is arguably more important. To build lean muscle mass, you must give your body the nutrients it needs to grow. Here are three easy nutrition tips to

1. Calorie Surplus

To gain muscle, you must eat more calories than your body burns. However, this doesn’t mean unlimited junk food. Aim for a slight caloric surplus with nutrient-dense foods to support muscle growth without excessive body fat gain. You only need a 10-20% bump in calories above maintenance. For example, if your maintenance intake is 2,500 calories, 2750 to 3000 would be enough to maximize muscle growth.

2. Eat 1g of Protein Per Pound of Bodyweight

Stop me if you have heard this before – protein is critical for building muscle. Well, it’s one thing to know it, and it’s another to practice it consistently. Consume at least 25 grams of high-quality protein distributed evenly across your meals to maximize protein synthesis.

3. Prioritize Pre-Workout Meal

Meal timing takes a back seat to total daily intake. In other words, the total amount of calories, protein, carbohydrates, and fat you eat daily is more important than when you eat them. That said, to maximize performance, pay attention to what you eat 1-2 hours before your workout.

A good pre-workout meal gives your body the necessary fuel to enhance energy levels, improve performance, and optimize nutrient availability. My best practical tip is to avoid stomach discomfort before working out. Avoid anything that can cause GI issues. Some common culprits are foods high in fiber, fat, or sugar alcohols. I like a protein shake and a piece of fruit or a bowl of chicken breast and rice.

Supplement Stack for Muscle Mass

The final piece of the muscle-building puzzle is supplements. Once you have your training and nutrition dialed in, these three supplements can help round out the plan.

  • Protein Powder:Protein supplements are an easy way to meet your daily protein needs. In terms of type, it doesn’t matter – whey, casein, milk protein, and even some vegan blends are high quality. The key is finding a product you like. If it tastes good, you are more likely to use it.
  • Creatine:Creatine is a naturally occurring substance that helps your body generate energy during strenuous exercise. Increasing the availability of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the body’s primary energy currency, creatine supplementation can improve strength, performance, and muscle gains over time. Creatine monohydrate is still the best form. Take 3-5g a day.
  • Caffeine:Everyone’s favorite morning beverage is a performance enhancer, too. Supplementing with caffeine pre-training can enhance endurance, strength, and focus, allowing you to push through challenging workouts and potentially increasing the overall effectiveness of your muscle-building efforts. Take 200-400mg 30 minutes before training as needed.

exercise plan for muscle gain

FAQs

Have more questions about training for muscle gain? Let’s answer them.

Is it possible to get fit in 12 weeks?

Yes, significant improvements in fitness, including increased muscle and strength, can be achieved in 12 weeks with a consistent and well-rounded strength training routine.

Can you gain 10 pounds of muscle in 12 weeks?

Gaining 10 pounds of muscle in 12 weeks is generally considered unrealistic. However, substantial muscle growth can still occur with a well-structured workout and nutrition plan in 12 weeks.

Can I transform my body in 12 weeks?

You can experience a noticeable body transformation in 12 weeks by combining a disciplined workout routine with a good diet, focusing on muscle building and fat loss.

Is 12 sets a week enough for muscle growth?

Yes, as long as the 12 sets are performed close to failure, there is enough volume for muscle growth.

Conclusion

On the surface, this article is a 12-week muscle-building program. However, the real journey isn’t just about sets and reps; it’s a commitment to unlocking your potential. The 12-week program outlined above is just the starting point. Building muscle takes time. Regardless of whether you are a seasoned fitness enthusiast or just starting, celebrate the small victories, stay focused, and enjoy the process.

References:

  1. Schoenfeld, B. J., Grgic, J., Van Every, D. W., & Plotkin, D. L. (2021). Loading Recommendations for Muscle Strength, Hypertrophy, and Local Endurance: A Re-Examination of the Repetition Continuum. Sports, 9(2). https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9020032
  2. Schoenfeld, B. J., Ogborn, D., & Krieger, J. W. (2017). Dose-response relationship between weekly resistance training volume and increases in muscle mass: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Sports Sciences, 35(11), 1073–1082. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2016.1210197
  3. Schoenfeld, B. J., Grgic, J., & Krieger, J. (2019). How many times per week should a muscle be trained to maximize muscle hypertrophy? A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies examining the effects of resistance training frequency. Journal of Sports Sciences, 37(11), 1286–1295. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2018.1555906

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